Camel Wrestling

Istanbul, Turkey
Istanbul. Once one lays eyes on the magical skyline, the sight is never forgotten.

Forget that familiar, beatific, mellow picture on the cover of the cigarette pack. Put aside those lingering images of the sensuous East so popular with Victorian Orientalists. Elbowing up to the steel fence around a camel wrestling pitch in Turkey and I suppose anywhere is more like spending an afternoon with the good old boys at a NASCAR rally in the broiling sun of the American Deep South than snoozing on a divan with a plump, warm odalisque. Continue reading “Camel Wrestling”

LOOKING FOR LAFAYETTE

Marquis de Lafayette
Gilbert du Mother de Lafayette

At some point after being born in Lafayette, Louisiana, I became aware of both how oddly common it was to see this name on the landscape and, later, I began to look into the history of Lafayette as a character. Part of my family lives up east, so I may have seen signs in Manhattan on a visit, and then slowly notes other examples.  Think about it. You’ve probably come across a county, city, street, park, school, shop, or restaurant named for Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette more than just a few times by now.

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The Exotic Other – French Impressionism & Japanese Woodblocks

Georges Seurat

This article strays from my more typical pastures of Louisiana to discuss the historic appropriation of aesthetic and design elements from Asia into Western art and their functions as mediating devices. I want to discuss how it seems to me that those elements present a kind of familiarity for visitors to Asia, a familiarity that ameliorates anxiety associated with presentation of the exotic.

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“Alluring” Fun – Fly Fishing the Atchafalaya Basin

fly fishing
The Quiet Solitude of Fly Fishing

For generations, people have been fishing the Atchafalaya Basin region for commercial harvests and for sport. Yet, the idea of fly-fishing in the Atchafalaya is fairly new.  While the Basin, itself, is fresh water, within twenty minutes anglers can access the brackish water of the Basin’s coastal edges, and the salt-water margins of the Gulf of Mexico.  In these varied eco-systems, anglers who come to Louisiana may seek out bass, bream, catfish, redfish, sac-a-lait, speckled trout, and other species—using lighter tackle in fresh water and heavier gear in salty areas.

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“Post-Modern Nipples” There’s a Thousand Stories in the Nakes City

 

Burlesque and Striptease
Once Comedy, Satire, and Wit, Now Mostly Stirptise, Baudy Dance Can Still Be Entertaining

The frisson existing between real and faux events, as between standard human mating ritual and performative settings such as strip tease is exceptionally well defined by the “latex nipples” case which went to court in Lafayette, Louisiana decades ago – way back in about 1994 or so. In Lafayette, a medium sized city in the center of south Louisiana’s “Cajun Land,” apparently part of the regulatory apparatus involved with so-called “gentleman’s clubs” is attached to the corpus of obscenity law.

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Dr. Leisure Dithers About His Doo-Dads: What’s Enough to Close a Cuff?

Cuff Links

One fine summer’s day, the great Lord Curzon, then British secretary of state for foreign affairs, received a delegation from Mosul,” historian Jacques Darras recalls. “When they were ushered in to his presence he was busy writing and he invited them to go to the window and to look at the people enjoying the sunshine in the park. They were polite men and they did so. After a while Lord Curzon joined them. ‘How many people do you think we can see?’ he asked. Since they were especially polite men the delegation ventured on a number of guesses. But the secretary of state soon put an end to the conversation. ‘It doesn’t matter how many there are,’ he said. ‘But you can be sure of one thing. Not a single one of them has ever heard of Mosul.’ Thus the delegation was put in its place. They knew how unimportant they were. Unlike Mosul, cufflinks can be important.

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Ad Hoc Gardens of Japan – a Photo Show

 

Ad Hoc Gardens of Japan

Although informally known as Dr. Leisure, I am a Louisiana artist and scholar.  I received my fine art degree from the University of Southwestern Louisiana in the seventies. I have been active in draftsmanship, painting, and related undertaking since then, but am currently most fully engaged in photography – and of course working to develop my blog/vlog.  My first important show of fine art photographs upon returning to the USA is a collection of Japanese “ad hoc” gardens. In addition, I published a scholarly study of cock fighting (which I illustrated) just as that infamous sport was becoming illegal.

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Hern, New Orleans, and Japan

Hearn in Japan
Memorial Bust of Lafcadio Hearn

Lafcadio Hearn, great explainer of Japan to the West and well known for his narratives about New Orleans, soulful descriptions of that sultry city on the Big Muddy, said that “in order to comprehend the beauty of a Japanese garden, it is necessary to understand — or at least to learn to understand — the beauty of stones.” Hearn was writing at a time when Japan had only been widely opened to visitors for decades. And Europe and the US was in thrall to a “Japonais” rampage of fashion. Yet few were absorbing the great foundation philosophy underpinning much of the design flowing onto Impressionists canvases from Asia.

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